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Nevadans cite democracy, border, economy while voting in primary

Yanira Graham, right, walks out of the Clark County Government Center with her mother Dolores Graham after voting Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2024, in Las Vegas.
Mark J. Terrill
/
AP
Yanira Graham, right, walks out of the Clark County Government Center with her mother Dolores Graham after voting Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2024, in Las Vegas.

NORTHERN NEVADA

Voters in Northern Nevada braved cold weather and scattered snow showers to cast ballots in Tuesday’s Presidential Preference Primaries. Republicans and Democrats alike said concern over the U.S.-Mexico border will be a central issue this election cycle.

It’s a dreary election day in Northern Nevada. A layer of snow from a recent storm blankets much of the Reno/Sparks area. But the cold hasn’t kept Kevin Porter from the polls.

A registered Democrat, Porter cast a vote for President Joe Biden, but said the administration needs to do more on immigration.

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"The humanitarian issues should be handled at the border, and there has to be some let in as refugees, but we really need to do a better job of vetting."

Immigration was also a top issue for Gary Labell, a Republican voter.

"i think the border problem is the biggest issue. I mean, it's crazy, what's happened with so many illegal immigrants coming in."

Labell wouldn’t discuss who he voted for in the primary but said he planned to caucus for former President Donald Trump during the GOP Caucus on Thursday.


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SOUTHERN NEVADA

Nevadans braved the Las Vegas rain Tuesday to cast their ballots in the state’s Presidential Preference Primary.

They cited the health of American democracy and the economy as issues that drove them to the polls.

In-person turnout was scant at the Cambridge Recreation Center polling place near UNLV’s main campus in the heart of Las Vegas.

Democrats and Republicans appeared equally represented, even though the GOP primary won’t count. The state party will select its delegates based on the results of a separate caucus.

Democrat Steven Lee said he felt compelled to vote for President Joe Biden out of concern for the future of domestic and national security.

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“President Biden upholds democracy, security through NATO and Europe, and a great economy for most people.”

As of 10 a.m, 3,800 voters had already visited an in-person polling place in Nevada, according to the Secretary of State. Some 150,000 mail-in ballots were cast before the primary.

Polls close today at 7 p.m.

The Republican caucus is scheduled to take place Thursday evening.

Christopher Alvarez is a news producer and podcast audio editor at Nevada Public Radio for the State of Nevada program, and has been with them for over a year.
Paul serves as KNPR's producer and reporter in Northern Nevada. Based in Reno, Paul specializes in covering state government and the legislature.