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Plans change again for the A's Las Vegas ballpark. Will taxpayers be on the hook?

Oakland Athletics fans returned to RingCentral Coliseum this spring for the first time since 2019 because of the pandemic. The team is considering relocating to Southern Nevada if it can't get a deal for a new stadium in Oakland.
Associated Press
Oakland Athletics fans returned to RingCentral Coliseum this spring for the first time since 2019 because of the pandemic. The team is considering relocating to Southern Nevada if it can't get a deal for a new stadium in Oakland.

A plan to give $500 million in tax incentives to build a stadium for the losing Oakland Athletics in Las Vegas has been met with lukewarm support. 

The A’s first wanted $500 million. Then it went to $395 million. Now they are looking for $195 million in tax abatements.

So, where will the team get the other $200 million that they want? Well, Clark County taxpayers. At least, that’s the latest proposal.

But does that mean county taxpayers will be on the hook for $200 million if the money made at the stadium isn’t enough to pay bond holders who put in the $200 million?

Is a deal to draw the worst team in baseball, with notoriously cheap owners, something that could get politicians in the legislature, in Clark County and the governor unelected? Or does everyone think this is a good idea?


Guests: Paul Boger, Northern Nevada reporter and producer, Nevada Public Radio; Howard Stutz, gaming and tourism reporter, The Nevada Independent; Annette Magnus, executive director, Battle Born Progress; Marco Henry, producer, Production Manager

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Paul serves as KNPR's producer and reporter in Northern Nevada. Based in Reno, Paul specializes in covering state government and the legislature.
Mike has been a producer for State of Nevada since 2019. He produces — and occasionally hosts — segments covering entertainment, gaming & tourism, sports, health, Nevada’s marijuana industry, and other areas of Nevada life.
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