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NPR
The Two-Way

Panama Papers: Here's What You Need To Know (So Far)

Apr 04, 2016
Who leaked the papers? Are the schemes uncovered illegal? We answer some pressing questions about the huge document leak.
NPR
Parallels

ISIS Attracts Ex-Cons, Creating A New Brand Of Jihadist

Mar 31, 2016
Many criminals are radicalized in prison and seem particularly receptive to the Islamic State message. It's leading to a new type of jihadist — part gangster, part terrorist.
NPR
Parallels

In Divided Belgium, Some Find That Trauma Unites Them

Mar 28, 2016
Belgium is divided linguistically, culturally and politically. Yet the Brussels bombings have also brought citizens together in ways they hadn't expected.
NPR
Goats and Soda

A 'Forgotten Disease' Is Suddenly Causing New Worries

Mar 25, 2016
Yellow fever is spreading in Angola. Experts are afraid it could spread further in Africa and Asia. This couldn't come at a worse time.
NPR
Goats and Soda

A Day At The Beach Is A Way Of Saying 'We're Not Afraid' Of Terrorists

Mar 24, 2016
A mother in Ivory Coast defiantly brings her children to the resort town where al-Qaida terrorists killed 19 people on March 13. A new music video reinforces her stand.
NPR
Parallels

Despite The Awkward Timing, Argentina Welcomes Obama

Mar 23, 2016
The president's visit falls on the 40th anniversary of Argentina's military coup that led to the so-called Dirty War. He has promised to declassify documents shedding light on what the U.S. knew.
NPR
Europe

Advocacy Groups Take Issue With EU's New Migrant Deal

Mar 19, 2016
Humanitarian groups are not happy about a deal between the European Union and Turkey on how to handle the influx of migrants. Iverna McGowan of Amnesty international shares her take.
Classical
Deceptive Cadence

An Iraq War Opera Finds A Vein Of Empathy

Mar 18, 2016
Fallujah is based on the experiences of a real Marine, who lost friends and more as a gunner in Iraq. The show's libretto was written by an Iraqi-American.
NPR
The Two-Way

Family Of Slain Indigenous Rights Activist Wants U.S. To Stop Funding Honduras

Mar 17, 2016
Berta Cáceres' family says Honduras is a repressive regime that doesn't deserve U.S. help. But driving a wedge between two long-time allies is a Herculean task.
NPR
Parallels

China's Legislative Session: Many Stars, But Little Power

Mar 15, 2016
China's legislature, long dismissed as a "rubber stamp" and empty political theater, attracts some of the country's wealthiest and most prominent figures. But how much can it accomplish?
NPR
Goats and Soda

The Poignant Cry Of Babies With Birth Defects Linked to Zika

Mar 14, 2016
The "new microcephaly." That's what doctors in Brazil are calling the birth defect believed to be caused by the Zika virus because it seems much worse than cases that have occurred for other reasons.
NPR
Parallels

After Tsunami And Quake, A U.S.-Japan Partnership To 'Give Hope'

Mar 11, 2016
When the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis hit Japan in 2011, U.S. troops delivered aid in Operation Tomodachi, Japanese for "friends." Another Tomodachi program brings Japanese kids to the U.S.
NPR
The Two-Way

Water, Soil And Radiation: Why Fukushima Will Take Decades To Clean Up

Mar 10, 2016
Five years after meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan, progress has been made, but there's still plenty to do.
NPR
Parallels

Feeling Unwanted In Germany, Some Afghan Migrants Head Home

Mar 09, 2016
Some 150,000 Afghan migrants arrived in Germany last year. But the Germans estimate more than half won't qualify for asylum. A small number have turned around and headed home.
NPR
All Tech Considered

For U.S. Tech Firms Abroad And Data In The Cloud, Whose Laws Apply?

Mar 03, 2016
The FBI's efforts to unlock the San Bernardino iPhone is one fight in a larger global conflict: Firms face varying laws for police cooperation and say a lack of legal standards is creating a crisis.
NPR
Goats and Soda

Reporting On The Zika Virus Means Getting Up Close And Personal

Feb 29, 2016
A visit to a Brazilian virology laboratory at the epicenter of the Zika outbreak gives a reporter a close encounter with the mysterious virus that has triggered a global health emergency.
NPR
Shots - Health News

Why Scientists Hope To Inject Some People With Zika Virus

Feb 25, 2016
There's no vaccine yet, but Zika researchers are racing to find a good candidate. After testing it in animals, checking for effectiveness in humans might include injecting Zika into healthy people.
NPR
The Two-Way

Mysterious Ocean Buzz Traced To Daily Fish Migration

Feb 22, 2016
Scientists say the buzz picked up by hydrophones in the Pacific may be caused by "fish farts" — the emptying of air bladders that let clouds of fish rise and fall during daily hunts for food.
NPR
Shots - Health News

How Scientists Misread The Threat Of Zika Virus

Feb 19, 2016
Zika was ignored by infectious disease scientists for years. This happens more often than you might think, especially with diseases discovered in remote regions. A researcher says we can do better.
NPR
All Tech Considered

Space Archaeologist Wants Your Help To Find Ancient Sites

Feb 17, 2016
Sarah Parcak uses satellite imagery to identify hidden sites. The winner of the 2016 TED Prize now plans to invite everyone to help her locate historical treasures.
NPR
All Tech Considered

How Major Chinese Banks Help Sell Knock-Offs

Feb 16, 2016
Leading banks in China are facilitating the sale of counterfeit handbags, clothes and other knock-off goods online, by hosting bank accounts for bogus manufacturers.
NPR
All Tech Considered

Colonialism Comment Puts Facebook Under Scrutiny

Feb 12, 2016
A Facebook board member lambasted a decision by regulators in India, the social network's second-largest market. He thereby sparked new scrutiny of Facebook's intentions in that country.
NPR
Shots - Health News

Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA

Feb 11, 2016
Some of the genetic variations in human DNA that have been linked to quick clotting or depression or diabetes lie within or near the genetic stretches we picked up from Neanderthals, a study finds.
NPR
Shots - Health News

Virus Profilers Race To Figure Out What Makes Zika Tick

Feb 09, 2016
Though Zika was discovered in 1947, few scientists since had studied the virus. Now, while some check its genes, others turn to placental cells for clues to any link between Zika and birth defects.
NPR
Parallels

Britain To Foreign Workers: If You Don't Make $50,000 A Year, Please Leave

Feb 03, 2016
To reduce the number of foreign workers, some of those making less than $50,000 won't qualify to stay in Britain beyond April. Critics say the deal would cause labor shortages.

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