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Back in the 1930s and 40s, Nevada was one of the few states you could get a quick divorce. So many people flew in for a few weeks or months - the time it took to complete the paperwork. They stayed on "divorce ranches" - complete with cowboys, horse rides, and cocktail hours. Sometimes even Hollywood stars came to stay: Clark Gable and Ava Gardner, among others. We take a look back at the "divorce ranches" with a historian, a former guest, a ranch owner, and a cowboy who said he'd "died and gone to heaven" when he saw all those ladies.

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Marilu Norden, former guest at Pyramid Lake Ranch; author, Unbridled: A Tale of a Divorce Ranch
Bill McGee, former cowboy at Flying M E Ranch; co-author, The Divorce Seekers: A Photo Memoir of a Nevada Dude Wrangler

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Beth Ward, former owner, Whitney Ranch
Mella Harmon, architectural historian who studied the divorce trade

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