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Peloton Says It's Been Subpoenaed By DOJ And DHS Over Its Product Injury Reporting

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The Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have subpoenaed Peloton, the company says, for documents and information about reporting on injuries associated with one of its treadmill products.
Jeff Chiu, AP

The Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have subpoenaed Peloton, the company says, for documents and information about reporting on injuries associated with one of its treadmill products.

Exercise equipment company Peloton says it's being subpoenaed by the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security for documents and other information regarding its reporting of people's injuries associated with its products.

In a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filing Friday, the company also said the SEC was investigating public disclosures related to the injuries, and that it was the subject of several lawsuits.

When reached by NPR, Peloton said it "cannot comment on active litigation." The Justice Department and Department of Homeland Security did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

In May, the company announced it was recalling the Tread+ treadmill after 72 reports of people, objects and animals being pulled under the machine. Peloton says there were 29 reports of injuries to children that resulted in serious abrasions, broken bones, and lacerations — and one incident of a child dying.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a separate warning in April to consumers about the safety hazards associated with the Tread+ product. Peloton initially refused to recall the treadmill before changing course in early May.

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Peloton noted in the SEC filing that the CPSC's investigation is still ongoing.

"We intend to cooperate fully with each of these investigations, and at this time, we are unable to predict the eventual scope, duration or outcome of the investigations," Peloton said in the SEC filing.

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