NPR
Jazz Night In America: Video Episodes And Shorts

Crosscurrents: Converging Jazz And Indian Classical Music

622290955_615638564.jpg

Bassist Dave Holland and tabla player Zakir Hussain perform as part of Crosscurrents at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City.
Lawrence Sumulong, Jazz at Lincoln Center

Bassist Dave Holland and tabla player Zakir Hussain perform as part of Crosscurrents at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City.

Virtuosity — of a dazzling, ebullient, yet altogether generous sort — might be the most obvious bridge between David Holland and Zakir Hussain. But there's also a deep cultural foundation behind their musical dialogue, which forms the beating heart of a project called Crosscurrents.

Hussain, a peerless master of the Indian tabla, and Holland, an English-born bassist of sterling jazz renown, were both shaped in some way by the 1960s, a decade of awakening and convergence. In this episode of Jazz Night in America, we'll explore the influence of Indian music on the jazz and rock scenes of that era — as well as the less familiar story of jazz's influence on the subcontinent, embodied by musicians like pianist and composer Louiz Banks.

We'll hear music from a recent Jazz at Lincoln Center concert led by Hussain and Holland. Crosscurrents also features Banks, his son, drummer Gino Banks, along with acclaimed American saxophonist and flutist Chris Potter, Bollywood vocal star Shankar Mahadevan and Mumbai-based jazz guitarist Sanjay Divecha. We'll also get some valuable outside perspective from percussionist Sameer Gupta and other musicians in Brooklyn Raga Massive, which pursues a similar form of thrumming exchange.

Copyright 2018 WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center. To see more, visit WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center.

Support comes from

More from
,

You won’t find a paywall here. Come as often as you like — we’re not counting. You’ve found a like-minded tribe that cherishes what a free press stands for. If you can spend another couple of minutes making a pledge of as little as $5, you’ll feel like a superhero defending democracy for less than the cost of a month of Netflix.