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Feel The Mysterious Ennui Of The Peacers' Psychedelic 'Staying Home'

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A still from The Peacers' "Staying Home" video.
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A still from The Peacers' "Staying Home" video.

The Peacers' new album, Introducing The Crimsmen, gargles psychedelic music like purple milk. It is weird as it is sweet, with short, reverb-heavy pop songs that subvert melodies with broken noises and chicken-fried guitar solos. The band collects some of San Francisco's modern psych scene — Mike Donovan (Sic Alps), Mike Shoun (Thee Oh Sees), Shayde Sartin (The Fresh & Onlys) and Bo Moore (Bozmo) — and spans gently strummed acoustic bummers and grizzled rockers.

"Staying Home" is the album's most realized and fully arranged track, a hangdog warble guided by a watery acoustic guitar, shuffled into existence by a spare drum kit crashing around Bo Moore's bleary-eyed croon. He repeats, "Dinner was a happening time / But now it's over," with resignation. Director William Keihn captures the song's mysterious ennui in a beautifully shot short film that flows freely from its two characters — "Grey" and "Pink" — plus a brief exchange with a stuffed dog, culminating in its burial and burning.

Introducing The Crimsmen comes out June 16 via Drag City.

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