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WATCH: Shadow Of The Moon Crosses Earth During Solar Eclipse

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A still image shows the Earth, as seen by Japanese geostationary satellites, during a total solar eclipse.
University of Wisconsin-Madison / CIMSS and Japan Meteorological Agency and NOAA
A still image shows the Earth, as seen by Japanese geostationary satellites, during a total solar eclipse.

On March 9, a total solar eclipse was perfectly visible in Indonesia. Alaska, Hawaii, parts of southeast Asia and some of Australia got a partial view.

The rest of us, alas, were out of luck.

But now you can enjoy the view from another angle — the solar eclipse as seen from space.

The Himawari geostationary satellites, operated by Japan's meteorological agency, captured the sight of the moon's shadow traveling across the Earth. Yasuhiko Sumida, a scientist visiting the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, stitched them together into the video above.

It was shared on the CIMSS Satellite Blog.

NASA satellites caught a glimpse of the moon shadow, too: The Deep Space Climate Observatory released the gif below.

NASA says this animation was "assembled from 13 images acquired by NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four-megapixel charge-coupled device (CCD) and Cassegrain telescope on the DSCOVR satellite."

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