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The Two-Way

Clinton To Testify Again Before Benghazi Committee

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies in January 2013 before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya.
Mandel Ngan, AFP/Getty Images
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies in January 2013 before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya.

Updated at 7:20 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is set to testify before a House committee investigating the Sept. 11, 2012 deaths of four Americans, including a U.S. ambassador, in Benghazi, Libya, according to her campaign.

Campaign spokesman Nick Merrill said the Democratic presidential candidate would appear on Oct. 22, but Reuters, quoting a committee statement, said the date of her testimony was still being negotiated.

According to The Associated Press, the chairman of the committee, South Carolina Republican Rep. Trey Gowdy, "initially requested a private interview."

The news follows a New York Times report that government investigators have discovered "potentially hundreds" of classified emails in a private email account that Clinton used while she was secretary of state. Her campaign has said that any classified material found on her private server was classified after the fact, not at the time the information was first stored there.

The candidate herself reiterated that position at a campaign event Saturday night. "I did not send nor receive anything that was classified at the time," Clinton told reporters, according to Reuters.

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Democrats have accused Gowdy's committee of a politically motivated witch-hunt designed to derail Clinton's 2016 presidential bid, a charge the South Carolina Republican lawmaker has denied.

Clinton testified at two congressional hearings in January 2013, denying that the White House put out misinformation about the 2012 Benghazi attacks.

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