Listen

News 88.9 KNPR
Classical 89.7 KCNV

member station

NPR
All Songs Considered

New Mix: Passion Pit, Franz Ferdinand With Sparks, Killer Mike & MNDR, More

398057691_678953127.jpg

Clockwise, from upper left: FFS (Franz Ferdinand and Sparks), Michael Angelakos of Passion Pit, Killer Mike, MNDR, BC Camplight
Courtesy of the artists
Clockwise, from upper left: FFS (Franz Ferdinand and Sparks), Michael Angelakos of Passion Pit, Killer Mike, MNDR, BC Camplight

On this week's All Songs Considered we talk about the secrets to being happy and how they relate to a euphoric new track from the electro-pop group Passion Pit. We'll hear the first song from Franz Ferdinand's collaboration with one of Bob Boilen's favorite bands from the early '70s — the wild, strange and playful duo Sparks. Together, as FFS, they cordially invite everyone to "piss off!"

Also making a comeback on this week's show: The legendary Northwest garage rock group The Sonics. It's been 35 years since they last put out an album, and 50 years since releasing their groundbreaking debut, Here Are The Sonics. But their new album sounds like no time has passed at all. We follow with a raucous Kentucky rock group called White Reaper that might not exist if it weren't for The Sonics. Co-host Robin Hilton shows off his earnest side by playing a soaring love song by BC Camplight that features an inspired melody. And the Los Angeles-based electronic musician MNDR and rapper Killer Mike have a slinky new song written for an upcoming version of the Grand Theft Auto V video game.

Support comes from

But first: Why is James Brown in the studio? And how come Bob feels so good? Get the answers by listening to the full show.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

You won’t find a paywall here. Come as often as you like — we’re not counting. You’ve found a like-minded tribe that cherishes what a free press stands for.  If you can spend another couple of minutes making a pledge of as little as $5, you’ll feel like a superhero defending democracy for less than the cost of a month of Netflix.