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The Salt

Mighty Farming Microbes: Companies Harness Bacteria To Give Crops A Boost

Jun 12, 2015
Will agricultural chemical dealers start selling microbes? Some big pesticide companies are investing in efforts to turn soil bacteria into tools that farmers can use to grow more food.
NPR
Shots - Health News

Some Insured Patients Still Skipping Care Because Of High Costs

Jun 10, 2015
Research shows that, even with health insurance, many people put off expensive surgery, medicine and tests because they can't afford the high deductibles or copays. A few states hope to change that.
NPR
It's All Politics

Advocates Push To Bring Solitary Confinement Out Of The Shadows

Jun 09, 2015
Some big states have been moving to limit the numbers of people they send to solitary but officials say it's necessary to maintain control and, in some cases, protect the prisoners themselves.
NPR
Movies

This Year, Women (And Girls) Rule The Big Screen

Jun 08, 2015
NPR film critic Bob Mondello notes that this year's most popular movies are surprisingly womancentric. That's more than at any other time in at least three decades.
NPR
U.S.

Trans In Transition: Finding Friends And Community In D.C.

Jun 06, 2015
While doing a profile of a transgender activist in Washington, D.C., NPR's Pam Fessler heard some touching personal stories from trans women trying to adapt to their new lives.
Classical
Deceptive Cadence

For Benedictine Monks, The Joy Of Making Albums And Beer

Jun 06, 2015
The Benedictine monks of Norcia, Italy spend their days in quiet prayer and chanting the divine office. But recently the order has taken up recording albums and brewing beer.
NPR
National Security

Why Are Only Three Observant Sikh Men Serving In The U.S. Military?

Jun 05, 2015
The Pentagon's ban on facial hair and religious headgear has long been an obstacle for Sikh men, who wear turbans and don't cut their hair. Sikhs are hoping a court ruling might lead to a rule change.
NPR
The Salt

California's War Over Water Has Farmer Fighting Farmer

Jun 04, 2015
Drought-stricken Central Valley farmers are pointing fingers at the Sacramento Delta, where water still flows reliably. There's more pressure than ever to change a long-standing water rights system.
NPR
National Security

Gen. Martin Dempsey On Iraq: A Fight That Will Take 'Multiple Years'

Jun 03, 2015
The Joint Chiefs chairman has been deeply involved in Iraq for more than a decade. In an NPR interview, he says he's not surprised by the slow going against ISIS, calling it a "long campaign."
NPR
Shots - Health News

Vaccine Court Aims To Protect Patients And Vaccines

Jun 02, 2015
It has been nearly 30 years since Congress established a special court to help keep good vaccines on the market and fairly compensate the rare person who has a severe reaction. Who wins these cases?
NPR
Parallels

As The Arctic Opens Up, The U.S. Is Down To A Single Icebreaker

Jun 01, 2015
Melting ice means more of the Arctic is accessible to exploration and shipping, and countries are racing to establish a presence. But they still need heavy icebreakers, and the U.S. is falling behind.
NPR
The Two-Way

All Eyes On Senate As Patriot Act Provisions Set To Expire

May 31, 2015
Three key provisions of the act sunset on June 1. The Senate has scheduled a rare Sunday session to try to pass a House measure that modifies some of the provisions.
NPR
Shots - Health News

When Are Employee Wellness Incentives No Longer Voluntary?

May 29, 2015
Many workers like the programs, and employers say they help hold down health insurance costs. But there are legal questions about how far companies can go to encourage participation.
NPR
It's All Politics

For Next President, The Fight Against Extremism Will Hit Closer To Home

May 27, 2015
The so-called Islamic State is endlessly creative in trying to get young men and women to leave home for Syria and Iraq. It's something the next president will have to wrestle with from Day 1.
NPR
NPR Ed

Behind The Curtain Of College Admissions, Fairness May Not Be Priority No. 1

May 23, 2015
A discrimination complaint against Harvard has renewed focus on the fairness of admissions decisions. The process must be rational, says counselor and blogger Jim Jump, but it's not often fair.
NPR
U.S.

Obama: Camden, N.J., Police A Model For Improving Community Relations

May 22, 2015
"Wherever you walk around, there goes a cop," says one resident, who is happy with the changes in the city. But some critics still see evidence of old-school police tactics that they say don't work.
NPR
Planet Money

How A Machine Learned To Spot Depression

May 20, 2015
The computer doesn't pay attention to what you say. What matters is how you say it.
NPR
NPR Ed

After Suicides, MIT Works To Relieve Student Pressure

May 14, 2015
In the past year, four students have died by suicide. The school has responded by asking professors to lighten workloads and is launching new suicide prevention efforts.
NPR
NPR Ed

Preschool By State: Who's Spending And What's It Buying?

May 11, 2015
A new, national report on state-funded pre-K sends a few mixed messages: Enrollment and funding are up ... but in many places still remarkably low.
NPR
Economy

Oil Companies Look To Fill Employment Gap With More Women

May 08, 2015
Less than 20 percent of oil-sector workers are female. That's a problem for an industry that needs legions of new workers to replace retirees. So firms are looking to draw more women into the field.
NPR
Shots - Health News

DNA 'Printing' A Big Boon To Research, But Some Raise Concerns

May 07, 2015
Companies are assembling and churning out tailored stretches of DNA faster and more cheaply than ever before. The tool speeds research into diseases of plants and people. But what about eugenics?
NPR
Shots - Health News

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

May 06, 2015
Near a field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, scientists discovered the DNA of microbes that seem to be primitive archaea, but with a lot more genes — typical of complicated creatures.
NPR
U.S.

From Oakland To Baltimore, Lessons Learned From Cities Of Unrest

May 05, 2015
What comes from such tragic events are crucial lessons about policing for other cities. Mainly, they've taught officials the importance of keeping the public informed and good community relationships.
NPR
Back At Base

How The Fall Of Saigon Turned San Diego Into A Home For Refugees

May 01, 2015
Forty years ago, the Nguyen family was among the first refugees to be brought to San Diego after the Vietnam War. Now the community they helped form has become home to refugees from around the world.
NPR
U.S.

Compton's Cowboys Keep The Old West Alive, And Kids Off The Streets

Apr 30, 2015
The city has seen some positive changes in recent years, including a reconnection with the city's rural past. The pastime has given youth an outlet in a region that's at the center of gang violence.

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