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The Grind: Inside Baseball's Endless Season

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Veteran Washington Post sportswriter Barry Svrluga chronicles a season with the Washington Nationals in his book "The Grind."

Kris Bryant’s dramatic two-out, two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth on Monday gave the Chicago Cubs a nine-to-eight win over the Colorado Rockies.

In Washington D.C, Bryce Harper – who is only 22 – is on pace for 49 home runs this season.

And Joey Gallo seems to be finding his swing again with the Round Rock Express, a minor league affiliate of the Texas Rangers.

All three players grew up in Las Vegas. They are also the center of the local sports universe in a town without a professional sports franchise.

So, what’s life like for a Major League Baseball player?

With 162 games to play, Major League Baseball holds the title of the longest sports season.

It’s not as physically demanding as playing in the National Hockey League or National Football League.

But, starting with spring training, baseball players pace themselves to get through the season, developing a unique rhythm they call the grind.

It’s an ability to be mentally and physically capable of playing 162 games in 183 days.

In "The Grind," writer Barry Svrluga chronicles a year in the life of major league baseball players, coaches and their families.

Svrluga told KNPR's State of Nevada that if Bryce Harper can stay healthy he has all the tools to be a top player for The Washington Nationals and MLB for the dozen years.

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Barry Svrluga

Courtesy: Blue Rider Press

The Washington Post published an excerpt from Svrluga's book titled The Veteran. The chapter deals with the Washington Nationals first ever draft pick Ryan Zimmerman who has moved from third base to first base as nagging injuries have take their toll on him.

Guests

Barry Svrluga, sportswriter, The Washington Post  

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KNPR's State of Nevada
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KNPR's State of Nevada