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Ticketed Shows Versus Club Life
Ticketed Shows Versus Club Life

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AIR DATE: August 1, 2013

by Marie Andrusewicz

GUESTS

Scott Zeiger, Co-Founder, Base Entertainment

Anthony Curtis, Las Vegas Advisor

BY MARIE ANDRUSEWICZ -- Recent economic trends have shown visitors in Las Vegas are spending more on shopping, dining and entertainment than they used to. The changing demographics of the Las Vegas visitor has also created some challenges for casino show promoters. The Review-Journal recently reported that the emergence of nightclubs and dayclubs has drawn customers away from stage shows on the Strip as younger visitors opt to skip shows after long pool days and before long club nights.

This presents a problem for large-scale entertainment producers like Base Entertianment.

“The only way we can make money in this business is from the box office,” says Scott Zeigler, co-founder of Base. “We don’t have other methods of making money – we’re not selling our patrons drinks, they’re not gambling at our tables, they’re not eating at our restaurants. They’re just buying our tickets, so we have to be much more aware of what show costs are.”

Base Entertainment produced the juggernaut Phantom of the Opera which went for $135 a ticket. Zeigler says that price made sense when visitors were paying $350 dollars for a room at the Venetian, where Phantom was a resident show. But the economy has changed. Even though it’s improving, tourists can get a room for a little over a hundred dollars, and multiple people stay in a room.

Anthony Curtis of Las Vegas Advisor says it’s a good news-bad news scenario -- more people are coming to Las Vegas, they’re just spending less. He says they want to say they’ve seen a show, but are less likely to shell out for extravaganzas like a Cirque or Base Entertainment production.

But Zeigler says he’s found one way of luring young-ish patrons, those who may be more willing to visit night clubs than shows, with his stage-show-night club, crossover experience, Absinthe.

“That particular show is selling out every night,” says Zeigler. “In many ways it’s an extension of the club experience.”

GUESTS

Scott Zeiger, Co-Founder, Base Entertainment

Anthony Curtis, Las Vegas Advisor


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