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This here's Bill Bob Briggs and hairs some food for thanking. Being that it's the Fourth of July, I got to feeling all patriotic and stuff so what naturally came to mind was that most patriotic of foods . . . you got it sports fans . . . barbecue.

Now you might think it was the holiday that got me motivated, but truth be told, what really got me madder 'n a wet hen was listenin' to lobster boy talk about some Argentina barbecue place that claims to know something about cooking meat . . . are these the same folks whose cowboys wear big round hats with little frilly balls around them and more silver than the Lone Ranger?? Yup. I knew there's gotta be some joint that can give these wienies what fer when you git a hankerin for good beef.

Now before we git to my research and all . . . let's get a few things straight. When I say barbecue, I'm not talking about puttin' wienies on the grill or overcookin' a bunch of burgers. Anyone who thanks that's barbecuin's dumber than a box of hair . . . no, when we're talkin' barbecue, we're talking low and slow -- the kinda cookin' ya start with the morning coffee and end when you're half way through you second case of Coors. I was gittin' hungry just thankin' 'bout such vittles. So I hitched up the bronco and spent the day lookin' fer the genuine article. And wouldn't ya know, it was at the Texas BBQ that I hit pay dirt. Yes siree, just like four years ago when I checked him out . . . little Joe Orduna is still doin' the best brisket west of the Pecos. Heck, just by the name ya know it's good and all it took was one bite to restore my faith in good ole American beef. Like I told the good folks here at KNPR, that food critic of theirs is a few fries short of a Happy Meal if he doesn't think the Texas BBQ is the best in town. I guarantee it, you put me and little Joe together and we'll kick those gauchos butts right back to Montana - just like they did at the Alamo.

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